Greetings from Kangaroo Lake, CA,
Here’s Katie Kumamoto from Stanford and Ken Austin from Unavco using matching range finders to find the distance across the lake while we wait for the TLS (terrestrial laser scanner) scan to finish. We spent a great couple days using a ground-based LiDAR system to create detailed 3D imagery of the contact of the Trinity Peridotite with local gabbro intrusions. Now it’s time for data reduction. Bring it on… 
Cheers,
Maxine Luckett, Masters student at Stanford University

Greetings from Kangaroo Lake, CA,

Here’s Katie Kumamoto from Stanford and Ken Austin from Unavco using matching range finders to find the distance across the lake while we wait for the TLS (terrestrial laser scanner) scan to finish. We spent a great couple days using a ground-based LiDAR system to create detailed 3D imagery of the contact of the Trinity Peridotite with local gabbro intrusions. Now it’s time for data reduction. Bring it on… 

Cheers,

Maxine Luckett, Masters student at Stanford University

Hey rock hounds!
We’re hiking off-trail through the Trinity Peridotite in Northern California on our way to Eunice Bluff to look at peridotites that are part of a larger ophiolite body. And by hiking, I mean trekking through miles of unmarked forest and thorny bushes and up cliff faces… all while carrying heavy equipment…But I guess it’s just another day in the life of a geologist!
Wish you were here! (We could really use some help carrying that equipment.)
Laura Zalles, undergraduate student at Stanford University

Hey rock hounds!

We’re hiking off-trail through the Trinity Peridotite in Northern California on our way to Eunice Bluff to look at peridotites that are part of a larger ophiolite body. And by hiking, I mean trekking through miles of unmarked forest and thorny bushes and up cliff faces… all while carrying heavy equipment…But I guess it’s just another day in the life of a geologist!

Wish you were here! (We could really use some help carrying that equipment.)

Laura Zalles, undergraduate student at Stanford University

Hey Rock Stars,
We were examining the ultramafics of the Trinity Ophiolite at Eunice Bluff, California. The foreground shows a harzburgite “island” sandwiched between two converging dunite melt channels. Off in the distance, you can see an ominous plume of smoke from a nearby forest fire.
Chris Kremer, student at Stanford University

Hey Rock Stars,

We were examining the ultramafics of the Trinity Ophiolite at Eunice Bluff, California. The foreground shows a harzburgite “island” sandwiched between two converging dunite melt channels. Off in the distance, you can see an ominous plume of smoke from a nearby forest fire.

Chris Kremer, student at Stanford University

An international research team led by Arizona State University scientists has developed a new approach to estimate CO2 emissions from burning fossil fuels — one that provides crucial information to policymakers. Called the “Fossil Fuel Data Assimilation System” or FFDAS, this new system was used to quantify 15 years of CO2 emissions, every hour, for the entire planet — down to the city scale. Until now, scientists have estimated greenhouse gas emissions at courser scales or used less reliable techniques.

Researchers unveiled the new system in an article published Sept 10 in the Journal of Geophysical Research: Atmospheres.

Read more here.

lamontlog

Field Photo Friday

lamontlog:

image

Earlier this week a few of our microbiologists were on patrol with colleagues from Riverkeeper, sampling the Hudson River between Kingston and Catskill, N.Y. Their work is part of an ongoing project to survey the river’s water quality; all data from this collaboration is available onlineThis study is the only publicly available source of water quality data for large portions of the Hudson River. 

From our blogs: Seismic gap may be filled by an earthquake near Istanbul

When a segment of a major fault line goes quiet, it can mean one of two things: The “seismic gap” may simply be inactive — the result of two tectonic plates placidly gliding past each other — or the segment may be a source of potential earthquakes, quietly building tension over decades until an inevitable seismic release.

A new study published in Geophysical Research Letters, a journal of the American Geophysical Union, has found evidence for both types of behavior on different segments of the North Anatolian Fault — one of the most energetic earthquake zones in the world. The fault, similar in scale to California’s San Andreas Fault, stretches for about 1200 kilometers (745 miles) across northern Turkey and into the Aegean Sea.

The researchers analyzed 20 years of GPS data along the fault, and determined that the next large earthquake to strike the region will likely occur along a seismic gap beneath the Sea of Marmara, some five miles west of Istanbul. In contrast, the western segment of the seismic gap appears to be moving without producing large earthquakes.

Read the full blog post from MIT here.