Dear Everyone,
Hello from high above Jakarta, Indonesia. I’m flying drones one of the worlds largest cities in order to better understand the severe flooding which plagues the city. In Jakarta the skies are friendly and offer a chance to escape the hustle and bustle of the 28 million people below.
Bring more batteries, 
Frank Sedlar, Masters student at the University of Michigan.

Dear Everyone,

Hello from high above Jakarta, Indonesia. I’m flying drones one of the worlds largest cities in order to better understand the severe flooding which plagues the city. In Jakarta the skies are friendly and offer a chance to escape the hustle and bustle of the 28 million people below.

Bring more batteries,

Frank Sedlar, Masters student at the University of Michigan.

Massive debris pile reveals risk of huge tsunamis in Hawaii

A mass of marine debris discovered in a giant sinkhole in the Hawaiian islands provides evidence that at least one mammoth tsunami, larger than any in Hawaii’s recorded history, has struck the islands, and that a similar disaster could happen again, new research finds. 

Scientists are reporting that a wall of water up to nine meters (30 feet) high surged onto Hawaiian shores about 500 years ago. A 9.0-magnitude earthquake off the coast of the Aleutian Islands triggered the mighty wave, which left behind up to nine shipping containers worth of ocean sediment in a sinkhole on the island of Kauai.

Read the full press release here.

Photos from the Haleakalā volcano summit (~10,000ft above sea level), by Max Wendel. 

Haleakalā is a massive shield volcano on the island of Maui, Hawaii. The “crater” isn’t a crater in the literal sense—it wasn’t created by a volcanic explosion—rather it is the result of thousands upon thousands of years of erosion. Scientists believe that the volcano last erupted in 1790.

The bottom photo features the Haleakalā Observatories, used in astronomical and astrophysical research.